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What To Look For In A Password Manager

Your password is the first step to online security. With a weak password, or a one-size-fits-all solution, accounts are easy to break into. Following that, one data breach leads to many as the same password opens account after account. Nevertheless, a strong, secure password for every site seems like a big job. Remembering every special character and capital letter and what works for each site is a quick way to the ‘Forgot Password’ button.

Zinc Digital’s Service desk support a number of platforms, and with that many users it’s natural that we get a lot of calls about lost passwords.  

This is where a password manager comes in. It’s a piece of software on your computer that’s there to remember every password so that you don’t have to – no matter how complex. Depending on your needs, there are a lot of options on the market. Here’s what to look for in a good one:

Cost

As with any product, price is a factor for both sides. Most password managers have a good free offering, but you’re likely to be limited when it comes to the amount of passwords you can store or the number of devices you can use. If you’re only going to be logging in from one place, or just need to remember a few passwords, a free password manager will do just fine. Otherwise, pinpoint what you need from your password manager and choose one that gives you the best value for money when it comes to that service.

Encryption

The encryption is arguably the most important part of the password manager you choose. If this isn’t offering sufficient protection, all the extra features in the world aren’t worth it. There are several levels of encryption – make sure that yours is protected with AES standard encryption as a minimum. If you’re looking for the highest level of protection, go for AES 256 bit encryption.

Local or Cloud

Password managers vary regarding where they store their information. Some store the password locally on the device, and some are kept on the cloud. With local storage, you’re only able to store your passwords in one place, but a cloud storage solution is more vulnerable simply because it is in the public domain; although there will always be encryption in place. There is no right or wrong – it’s about what works for your needs. Some of the higher-quality password managers will do both, so you can decide what is kept where.

2 Factor Authentication

Any additional security in the place where you keep your passwords is priceless. 2 Factor Authentication confirms your identity with a second round of security checks, whether it’s a fingerprint scan, SMS, or pin. It’s a one-time measure on each device that will help keep your data even safer.

Password Importation

Inputting every password can become a mammoth task if you’ve got a lot and they’re stored all over. Some password managers can import your passwords in from your browser so that you don’t have to trawl through and input them individually. Some also come with autofill so that once your passwords are in, there’s no more searching.

Password managers come with a wealth of additional features – they could help you generate secure passwords in future, double up as a digital wallet to store your payment information and even digitally store secure data like birth certificates and passports. The most basic, most important feature however is security.

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